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Posts for tag: oral health

By Dental Associates of Shelton
December 18, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Resolvedfor2022HealthierTeethandGumsandaMoreAttractiveSmile

That rumble you hear is 2022 about to roar into your life on New Year's Eve—so, you better get hopping on those resolutions! And rather than go with the old standbys—exercising more, losing weight or taking up a new hobby—consider trying, à la Monty Python, "something completely different": doing something special for your teeth and gums.

Actually, we're talking about two goals in one: improving your overall oral health and enhancing your smile. Here's how you can make 2022 your year for a healthier and more attractive smile.

Daily oral hygiene. One of the biggest hindrances to your smile's health and appearance is dental plaque. This thin bacterial film that accumulates on tooth surfaces is the number one trigger for tooth decay and gum disease. Its crusty appearance also dulls your teeth and robs them of their natural shine. Resolve, then, to brush and floss every day to remove dental plaque and brighten your smile.

Regular dental visits. There are a number of benefits for twice-a-year dental visits. For one, a professional dental cleaning removes any plaque and tartar (hardened plaque) you might have missed with daily cleaning—and your hygienist may complete the session with polishing paste to ramp up your teeth's shine. It's also a chance for your dentist to examine your teeth and gums for signs of disease.

Veneers or crowns. It's common for even healthy teeth to have some unattractive flaws. Veneers, custom-made shells of porcelain bonded to the face of visible teeth, can mask those imperfections. For more serious defects, we may recommend a full porcelain crown that not only protects a vulnerable tooth, but can certainly improve its looks.

Dental restorations. There are several ways to replace a missing tooth and restore both its function and appearance. Currently, the gold standard for dental restorations is the dental implant, which can be used to replace individual teeth or support dentures or bridges. Implants can also improve the long-term health of supporting bone.

Orthodontics. Crooked teeth aren't just unappealing—they're also harder to keep clean, and thus keep healthy. But we can straighten them with braces or clear aligner treatments to boost both your oral health and your smile. And, you can undergo orthodontics even if you're well past adolescence—as long as you and your mouth are reasonably healthy, you can have your teeth straightened at any age.

If you've resolved this year to improve your smile health and appearance, then don't delay. See us beginning in the new year to get started on a treatment plan. By the time you're ringing in 2023, you can have a healthier mouth and a more amazing smile.

If you would like more information about transforming your oral health and smile, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants: Your Third Set of Teeth.”

By Dental Associates of Shelton
July 31, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene   oral health  
TakeCareofYourTeethandGumsEvenWhileCamping

July is Park and Recreation Month, a great time to pack up the tent, bed roll and camp stove and head for your nearest state or national park. Just don't take the concept of "getting away from it all" too literally. It's not a good idea to leave all of civilization behind, particularly your daily oral hygiene and dental care habits.

You might think, What's the harm going a few days without brushing and flossing? Actually, there's plenty of harm—even a brief period of neglected oral hygiene is sufficient to give oral bacteria a chance to trigger a case of tooth decay or gum disease.

It's true that you're limited on what you can take with you into the great outdoors (that's kind of the point). But with a little forethought and wise packing, you can take care of your dental care needs and still tread lightly into the woods. Here then, are a few tips for taking care of your teeth and gums while camping.

Bring your toothbrush. There are some things in your personal toiletry you may not need in the wild (looking at you, razor). But you do need your toothbrush, toothpaste and a bit of dental floss or floss picks. We're really not talking about a lot of room, particularly if you go with travel sizes. Just be sure everyone has their own brush packed separately from each other to discourage bacterial spread.

Dry and seal hygiene items. Bacteria love moist environments—so be sure you thoroughly dry your toothbrush after use before you pack it away. You should also stow toothpaste in sealable bags so that its scent won't attract critters (bears seem partial to mint). And, be sure to clean up any toothpaste waste or used floss and dispose of items properly.

Be sure you have clean water. Brushing and flossing with clean water is something you might take for granted at home—but not in camp. Even the clearest stream water may not be as clean as it may look, so be sure you have a way to disinfect it. Alternatively, bottled water is a handy option for use while brushing and flossing your teeth.

Easy on the trail mix. Although seeds and nuts make up most popular snacking mixes for hiking or camping, they may also contain items like raisins or candy bits with high sugar content. Since sugar feeds the bacteria that cause dental disease, keep your snacking on these kinds of trail mixes to a minimum or opt for snacks without these sweetened items.

Camping can be a great adventure. Just be sure you're not setting yourself up for a different kind of adventure in dental treatment by taking care of your teeth and gums on your next big outing.

If you would like more information about taking care of your teeth no matter the season, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Daily Oral Hygiene.”

By Dental Associates of Shelton
January 30, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   tmj disorders   nutrition  
AdjustYourDiettoAccommodateTMDtoMaximizeNutrition

Eating is one of the pleasures — and necessities — of life, but people who suffer from temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) may find eating no pleasure at all — and they may not be eating the right nutritional balance of foods.

TMD is a collection of conditions that affect the jaw joints, connecting muscles and other related facial structures. If you've been diagnosed with TMD, you're probably not only acquainted with severe pain, but also difficulty opening your jaw as widely as normal. This can make it difficult to chew certain foods.

There are a number of effective treatments for TMD, including thermal therapy (hot or cold packs), joint exercise, medication or surgery (as a last resort). But these treatments often take time to make a noticeable difference. In the meantime, you may still need to change what and how you eat to ensure you're getting the nutrients your body needs.

The overall strategy should be to soften and reduce the chewing size of your food. With fruits and vegetables, you'll want to peel and discard any hard or chewy skins, and then chop the fruit flesh into smaller pieces. Steam or cook vegetables like greens, broccoli or cauliflower until they're soft and then chop them into smaller portions. You might also consider pureeing your fruit (and some vegetables) to make smoothies with ice, milk or yogurt, or vegetable-based soups.

Treat meat, poultry or seafood in much the same way, especially biting sizes. Besides cooking meats to tenderness, include moisteners like broths, gravies or brazing liquids to further make them easier to chew.

Dairy foods are an important source of nutrition: eat milk-based products like yogurt or cheese as much as you can handle. If you have problems with these or also nut butters, then consider meal replacement beverages like instant breakfast or whey protein beverages.

And don't forget whole grains. Although some can be hard to chew, you can prepare them in hot cereal form (like oatmeal) to tenderize them. You can also prepare thin bread toast and cut into smaller pieces.

Hopefully, your treatment will bring your TMD symptoms under manageable control. Until then (and after, if need be) adjust your diet to eat the foods that keep you healthy.

If you would like more information on maintaining a healthy diet with TMD, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Dental Associates of Shelton
August 17, 2016
Category: Oral Health
Tags: mouth sore   oral health  
HowtoDealwiththatIrritatingMouthSoreyoukeepRe-Biting

We've all done it — suddenly bit the inside of our mouth while chewing food. All too often our cheek, lip or tongue finds itself in the way of our teeth.

The small wound caused by these types of bites usually heals quickly. But it's also common for the natural swelling of these wounds to cause the skin to become prominent and thus more in the way when we eat. As a result we bite it again — and again. If bit a number of times, the old wound can form a bump made of tougher tissue.

Also known as a traumatic fibroma, this growth is made up of a protein called collagen that forms into strands of fibers, similar to scar tissue or a callous. As you continue to bite it, the fibers form a knot of tissue that becomes larger with each subsequent bite and re-healing.

Unlike malignant lesions that form relatively quickly, these types of lumps and bumps usually take time to form.  They're not injurious to health, but they can be irritating and painful when you re-bite them. We can alleviate this aggravation, though, by simply removing them.

The procedure, requiring the skills of an oral surgeon, periodontist or a general dentist with surgical training, begins with numbing the area with a local anesthetic. The fibroma is then removed and the area closed with two or three small stitches. With the fibroma gone, the tissue surface once again becomes flat and smooth; it should only take a few days to a week to completely heal with mild pain medication like ibuprofen to control any discomfort.

Once removed, we would have the excised tissue biopsied for any malignant cells. This is nothing to cause concern: while the fibroma is more than likely harmless, it's standard procedure to biopsy any excised tissue.

The big benefit is that the aggravating lump or bump that's been causing all the trouble is no more. You'll be able to carry on normal mouth function without worrying about biting it again.

If you would like more information on minor mouth sores and wounds, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Common Lumps and Bumps in the Mouth.”